Blog Category: productivity

The Conflict Between Perfection and “The Good”

Consider a few quotations on perfection:

Voltaire: “Perfection is the enemy of the good.”

Isaac Bashevis Singer: “Every creator painfully experiences the chasm between his inner vision and its ultimate expression.”

General George Patton: “A good plan implemented today is better than a perfect plan implemented tomorrow.”

How do you feel about perfection? Are you genuinely willing to settle for the good, or have you been hooked on a vision of perfection? When you settle for the good, how do you feel?

Have you won, or have you compromised? What is the most perfect thing you have ever done or experienced?

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

Managing Distractions Enhances Personal Productivity

Personal productivity is directly related to minimizing distractions. Technology has created potent means of distracting us . . . . thus, joining the infinite other ways that are available to diminish our productivity.

Knowing yourself is key. Make a list of what have been your favorite distractions. Decide how much time, if any, you are going to give each of them – and then stick to it. Work to decrease distractions over time.

EFFECTIVELY MANAGING DISTRACTIONS CAN DRAMATICALLY INCREASE YOUR RESULTS.

What have been your favorites? Is it best for you to limit them or to eliminate them altogether? Can you replace distractions with more useful activities like stretching, walking or other forms of exercise?

Getting out of our own way always improves our results. If you were really honest with yourself, how much difference would handling distractions make in your life?

Copyright 2009. E. B. Hutt Bush and Coaching for Results, Inc.

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

Pace Yourself For Optimal Productivity

Practice asking yourself, “What is the most productive thing that I can do now?” Surprisingly, it’s NOT DOING that is often most productive. We have often forgotten that resting or taking a break or stopping altogether can significantly enhance our productivity and our results.

Personal productivity is about pace and the optimal relationship between effort and peace. It’s completely possible – and even likely – that the most productive thing you could do is take a walk, take an hour off, even take a day off . . . . to recharge and recuperate from intense effort.

How would you assess yourself at pacing to be more productive? What has been your pattern, and how can it be improved? How often do you skip lunch and eat at your desk because you think you can get more done – and then felt burned out?

Are you more productive when you actually have a quitting time and stick to it? Can you avoid those times of being at your computer for so long that “more” becomes counter-productive?

Copyright 2009. E. B. Hutt Bush and Coaching for Results, Inc.

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

Use Feedback From Others to Enhance Personal Productivity

Getting insight about how to expand personal productivity needn’t be complicated. Each of us is surrounded by people who can give us valuable feedback.

Asking “How can I be more productive” may feel risky because you may fear that you’re opening yourself up to criticism . . . . . and that you may be hurt.

Conversely, depending on YOUR attitude, you may find that receiving frank, constructive feedback feels useful and, well, “productive.” Be in a mindset that you won’t take anything that is said to you personally, that you’ll only hear the positive intent, and you’ll refrain from judging or shaming yourself or others.

Everyone can improve, and our business colleagues, friends, family members, customers – almost everyone who knows us – can provide intelligence for us that we may have been unable or unwilling to see.

Be particularly curious as you solicit the opinions of those whom you perceive have less power than you – children, students, employees, vendors and the like. Assure them that their feedback can be frank as long as it’s constructive.

And then listen without interrupting. Ask for clarification if desired. Don’t defend. This is a learning exercise. Take the information and assess its value. Experiment with it and utilize it to grow.

Most of all, have fun! The payoff promises to be significantly enhanced productivity and results.

Copyright 2009. E. B. Hutt Bush and Coaching for Results, Inc.

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

Personal Productivity is Strategic Yield

What is personal productivity? Getting more done . . . . . in less and less time? Partially correct. Productivity is directly tied to the purpose of what you’re doing. The more what you’re doing is vital to your ultimate success, the more you’re being productive.

The best definition for “productive” in this context is: “Yielding favorable or useful results.” The ultimate measure of productivity is STRATEGIC YIELD.

By definition, “busy work” is not productive. High-yield action tends to be related to significant, long-term goals . . . meaning results that actually change your business and personal life.

How many high-yield hours, on average, do you have in an average day? What would it take to experience a significant improvement – or even a dramatic improvement – in the number of high-yield hours? What can you delegate or eliminate to make yourself more productive?

Copyright 2009. E. B. Hutt Bush and Coaching for Results, Inc.

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

Productivity Strategy for Stalled Projects

Now that Spring is here, let’s explore PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY and put attention on desired results that we’ve been putting off.

What are some highly worrisome tasks that have haunted you because they aren’t complete? Maybe you haven’t touched them in months. Writing, organizing, taxes, bookkeeping, filing, cleaning, etc.?

YOU KNOW WHAT THEY ARE! Things you know you’ve been putting off that have been stuck – things you have held as super difficult, tough, “can’t do right now,” “too big” kinds of things.

When I was a college student, I would sometimes buy $20 worth of gas rather than fill up the entire tank. Try that same technique here.

“I’ll give my (name of project) 30 minutes . . . . . or 60 minutes worth of my time.” No distractions, no emails, no phone calls or snacks. At the end of that session, schedule the next time you’ll use this approach.

Choose something that has lingered, haunted you, made you look the other way . . . . something you’ve been resisting. The time you take to address it incrementally will free up tremendous energy and productivity.

Copyright 2009. E. B. Hutt Bush and Coaching for Results, Inc.

by Hutt Bush • Copyright 2009-2012. Being Point®, Inc.
posted in: productivity

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